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PURIM LASTS FOREVER

by Rabbi Mordechai Cohen    
Torah from Dixie Staff Writer    

The Talmud tells us that after the coming of the Mashiach (Messiah), we will no longer celebrate any of the holidays that we currently celebrate - except for Purim. What is so special about Purim that, even after the Mashiach comes, it will continue to be celebrated?

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The Talmud tells us that after the coming of the Mashiach (Messiah), we will no longer celebrate any of the holidays that we currently celebrate - except for Purim. What is so special about Purim that, even after the Mashiach comes, it will continue to be celebrated?

To answer this question, we must first understand a fundamental difference between the holidays of Passover and Purim. Passover is a holiday on which Hashem performed open miracles. Hashem publicly changed the laws of nature to the point that everyone saw the hand of Hashem. However, Purim was just the opposite. There were no big miracles. No hailstones came crashing down on Haman's head. It seemed as if Hashem had nothing to do with it.

When the Mashiach comes, everyone will see the greatness of Hashem. There will no longer be a need for a holiday like Passover to prove to us that Hashem exists. As a result, there will also no longer be a need for any of the other festivals. We say in every Kiddush ushering in the holidays: "Zecher Litziat Mitzrayim - this holiday is in commemoration of the exodus from Egypt." If Passover will no longer be necessary, neither is any other festival which reminds us of leaving Egypt.

However, on Purim, when the hand of Hashem was not so clear, we had to train ourselves to understand that everything was coming from Hashem even though there were no big open miracles. This special midah (character trait or attribute) of always seeing Hashem's hand in everyday life became a part of the Jewish people as a result of Purim. This midah will always remain with us, even after the Mashiach comes. Therefore, of all the holidays, Purim will continue to be celebrated.

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Rabbi Mordechai Cohen teaches at Torah Day School of Atlanta.

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